Michael Blosil

I wrote this piece last night for the Huffington Post and I have decided to make it today’s blog post.
As for myself, I am off to a mini retreat, a day of Yoga and meditation.

Two weeks ago I wrote of Alexander McQueens’ Suicide, yesterday I wrote about Andrew Koenig’s. At the same time several suicides have taken place in Manhattan’s subway this month.
Just now I have learned that in Los Angeles, Marie Osmond’s 18-year-old son Michael Blosil has died. It is reported that Michael jumped to his death Friday night from a downtown Los Angeles apartment building.

“My family and I are devastated and in deep shock by the tragic loss of our dear Michael and ask that everyone respect our privacy during this difficult time,” Marie Osmond said in a statement through her publicist.
It appears that Michael suffered from depression.

Dear Michael’s mother, I understand your anguish only too well. I have no words of comfort as I myself am gravely wounded by my own son’s death by suicide. My beloved twenty year-old son, Andrew Williamson-Noble, jumped to his death from the 10th floor of Bobst, NYU’s main library on Novemebr 3rd, 2009.
Although not famous, my son’s death was all over the internet and the media before we had even made it home from the hospital. A picture of Andrew, taken from his Facebook home page, was splattered everywhere. And I read on the internet that my son had left a note.
Shocked and distressed though I was at the time, I have come to see that talking about suicide is an important way to help prevent it.
While still by Andrew’s side at the hospital, writhing in pain and reeling in shock to discover that my son, healthy as far as I knew, had taken his own life, my immediate reaction was not to disclose that he had killed himself, and looked for ways to explain his death when asked by family and friends. But as soon as I articulated the thought I discarded it.
My son was a Knight who had fallen in battle, whatever demons he fought it had taken his life to bring them down. Now he is a Fallen Knight and I stand with him.
Dear Marie, so is your son. It is up to us to take up from where they left off. To spread light where there is despair, to bring hope where there is hopelessness.
Our sons did their part, they gave their life that others may live. I stand with those who have died and anyone else who wants to join and help prevent suicide, which, in the United States alone takes the life of one person every sixteen minutes.
And you, dear Michael, take care wherever you are.

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16 thoughts on “Michael Blosil

  1. In the BIG discussion of suicide, let us not forget Joseph Stack: The man who flew his plane into the IRA building.

    As I listed in an earlier post,there are many kinds of suicide, and many different reasons. And, as I suggested previously, notice the different emotional responses we have have to the different kind of suicide.

    We have the “suicides of anger”, the “suicides of protest” , the “suicides of despair”, the “suicides of hysteria”,the “groups suicides”, etc.

    Confusing them is like confusing different kinds of cancer. Skin cancer on the nose is not the same as cancer of an internal organ in terms of the way it progresses and the way it can be treated. There is already so much misinformation and confusion on the subject of suicide as it is. I love Esmeralda’s idea of breaking the code of silence and shame surrounding what looks to be a little epidemic.

    Don’t forget the suicide bombers, either. I believe that there may be common thread -as well as differences – between them and a young woman who overdoses on sleeping pills. This is an important subject. Before you read my next sentence hold down both of your knees so that they don’t jerk up and hit your desk: Perhaps (just perhaps) understanding the forces that propel the latter to overdose might help us better understand the forces that propel a woman to wear a bomb and blow herself up in an open market place. Do not fall into the trap of simple analysis or name calling.

    • Mark, you’re great at pushing the conversation forward which is so important.

      YES, its true, skin cancer on the nose is different than cancer of an internal organ, and both will kill you if left untreated.

      Esmeralda, thank you again for giving us a safe place to discuss suicide, our pain and our healing.

    • One more thing Mark. Please read Tantrum’s “insightful” comment under yesterday’s entry: We Have Friends in Both Places.
      I don’t mean to make fun of him, but between you and me (he is really funny and he doesn’t even know it)

  2. Its like a ((((SLAP)))) each time I read another death by suicide. again, again, again… and I do believe we, as a community have the ability to prevent …yes, there I said it…prevent suicide. By incorporating therapy, medication, yoga, meditation – Eastern, Western, global outreach and understanding.

    Since 2003, I have attending a festival in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada called Burning Man. Although difficult to describe, it is at its core, a temporary community that unites radical self reliance and radical self expression. I first learned about it when I was reading through my son’s journals. He wrote about wanting to go, and so the year following his death, I went in his honor. I have been going ever since. To say that it was a life altering event would be an understatement.

    My healing began here as did a better understanding of my life’s true purpose.

    Each year, along with a giant wooden effigy of a “MAN” a Temple is erected. People come to the Temple to reflect about the loved ones they have lost. By the end of the week it is filled with memories, tributes and tears. My way of contributing is by compiling a book that I call LOVE LETTERS – it is a collection of names, stories and photo’s submitted by people that have lost someone they love to suicide. It is placed at the center alter for people to read and share. It connects those of us who are suffering with loss and those of us who are struggling to live with depression. They are not alone, we are not alone. It creates a dialogue – and opens a door to hope and healing. One love, one story, one outreach makes a difference.

    If you would like to contribute something to this years book of Love Letters please contact me at greenmonkeytales@live.com or at my blog greenmonkeytales.blogspot.com

    Please take the time to reach out to those who may be suffering. To listen, validate, comfort, and be present with them. Allow them to be vulnerable, honest, and awake; and engage them with hope.

    • Jono was in the temple at Burning Man thanks to Bill Gaylord. He showed us the pictures of the burn…we could see the souls billowing from the structure…Jono has gone to many places in his ashen state. Many loved him and carry him on their adventures. This makes me happy

  3. Susan, another connection…

    So glad I said it, almost didn’t. The pull that got me past my deepest grief, happened at Burning Man. I’ve been revamping my blog site all day and I included a brief video of David Best who was the original Temple Builder. Such a pure, passionate, beautiful being. He was the one who freed me of my guilt. A task I never thought was possible. My guilt was so overwhelming that when the police arrived to recover my son’s body, I confessed that I killed him.
    To this day, the transformation that culminated at Burning Man amazes me. That video combined with my story “Green Monkey” should give you a good picture Esmeralda.

    Love to you Susan and Esmeralda and to our beautiful sons… Kerry, Andrew and Jono. You are loved and we will carry your goodness forward.

  4. Has it been determined yet whether the suicide was after a telephone made by Nancy Grace of CNN to his home where she may have berated him to the point of considering suicide, because she’s in federal court right now for doing that to another victim?

      • She is a CNN television host that is alleged to have caused a suicide of a victim and has current lawsuits pending against her including at least one in federal court currently.

      • That is incredible. We’ve been trying to get Larry King to do a segment on Suicide, to help raise awareness, but we’ve been hitting a brick wall.

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